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Collection: Glasgow Syphilis Collection

Glasgow Syphilis Collection

Special Collections at the University of Glasgow possesses one of the strongest collections in the United Kingdom of early (i.e. pre 1820) printed works on syphilis, containing many extremely rare medical treatises.

This Wellcome-funded project has catalogued our c. 250 items in great detail and facilitated access to them via a dedicated web interface. The collection website organises the data in a number of ways (for example allowing the user to see a list of illustrated works, works organised by publication date and by language) and permits downloading of this list in a number of formats for easy re-use. Additionally, the site offers some curated highlights in terms of works by notable authors, rarities and a gallery (and link to Flickr set) of images from different works.


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